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The shepherd of indigenous Indian Innovation

Title URL: 
http://www.gautamblogs.com/2008/01/shepherd-of-indigenous-indian.html
Summary: 
There are some people whose name equals innovation in India. And a lot of them are unsung. However, a lot more of them might have remained unsung if it were not for Prof. Anil Gupta and his HoneyBee network. His former student and CEO of Naukri.com Sanjeev Bikhchandani writes: In the last twenty years HoneyBee has documented in its online database more than 70,000 inventions by innovators in rural India. These include – a cotton stripping / plucking machine, a manual milking machine, a coconut tree climbing device, a garlic peeling machine, a device to draw water from wells, herbal remedies, a cowdung powered cell phone charger, a plow and weeding device that can be attached to a motorcycle, a low cost cell phone based switch for household appliances and farm pump sets, a beach cleaner made from an adaptation of a groundnut separator, and a walnut peeling machine among others.
Source: 

Gautam Ghosh Blogs

The Great Indian Jugaad

Title URL: 
http://devdutt.com/the-great-indian-jugaad
Summary: 
According to Brahmavaivarta Puran, Kuber, the king of Yakshas, had a gardener called Hema, whose duty it was to gather fresh fragrant flowers every morning with which Kuber performed his daily worship of Shiva. One morning, smitten by desire for his beautiful wife, Hema refused to leave his bed and go to the garden. As a result Kuber did not get the flowers for his worship. Enraged, Kuber cursed Hema that he would be struck with an incurable skin disease and he would be separated from his wife forever. The curse took effect and Kuber’s gardener found himself alone and diseased in a faraway land. For years he suffered the curse, feeling there was no way out until one day, he told his story to a sage. Feeling sorry for Hema, the sage advised him to perform a vrat, an observance that involved fasting and praying all day on a particularly auspicious day. “If you observe this vrat with pure devotion, you will be liberated from this curse. Your health will be restored and you will be reunited with your wife.”
Source: 

Devdutt

Makeshift Miracles | The Indian Genius for Jugaad

Title URL: 
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/398740.cms
Summary: 
In the 1990s, the Narasimha Rao government took far-reaching initiatives to free the economy of stifling controls and paved the way for liberalisation and globalisation. The reordered set-up enabled Indian skills and enterprise to leapfrog into universal prominence, in some of the most happening areas like software, information technology, electronics, etc. Lately, global giants are lining up to start operations on Indian soil, involving mass relocation of jobs. The Guardian obliquely commented on how altered circumstances are compelling the British to plough back jobs 'plundered' from the subcontinent 200 years ago.
Source: 

The Times of India

Indias Development Noise - Good For Growth?

Title URL: 
http://desicritics.org/2007/09/22/011402.php
Summary: 
India has a lot of problems - population, apathy of the educated, pollution, and corruption. That is what keeps the country down. Can it move on? Tom Friedman said that technology is a great equalizer. Vinay Rai, however, disagreed. He said that the concept of Jugaad amongst the Indians was what made India so hot with technology. Technology doesn't make a place great, Rai said, people do. I couln't agree more! And THAT is what has worried me too. While we love Jugaad - or the unconventional ways to solve problems - we by contrast dislike system and standards. That is why it is difficult to find a way in Indian traffic. We love to hate lanes. For the uninitiated, India is chaotic. For those in India, the country has a method in that madness. The "way" that others cannot see is clear as crystal to one who lives in that world. Tolerance of Ambiguity has become so high that finally, ambiguity has a language. A language that has its own rules and its own syntax. Where each horn in the traffic is speaking and speaking clearly from one to another that the message is intended to be transmitted. The cacophony of the horns has a music. The Noise creates a unique music.
Source: 

Desicritics.org

Unravelling India's innovative streak

Title URL: 
http://www.rediff.com/money/2008/jan/28spec.htm
Summary: 
This was the high noon of the shortage economy. Necessity, the old cliche goes, is the mother of invention. That must make scarcity the father of innovation. India had to make do with very little, and as a result, every Indian, in his or her own way, became a master at jugaad, a Hindi word with pan-Indian usage that is, really, impossible to translate. It describes as nothing else does the ability to creatively "manage," to make do with quick-fix solutions. Jugaad developed into a survival skill for most Indians. It was the additional resource that gave greater returns within a framework of scarcity. Every obstacle thus became an opportunity, a showcase for ingenuity. My first experience with this phenomenon was on the road to the boarding school in the Himalayan foothills where I studied. I encountered an invention that Henry Ford would probably have taken off his hat to. It was the reused chassis of a bullock cart, powered by the engine end of a motorcycle.
Source: 

Rediff.com

India's Next Global Export: Innovation

Title URL: 
http://www.businessweek.com/innovate/content/dec2009/id2009121_864965.htm
Summary: 
On a November afternoon, a dozen executives from companies including investment banks Rothschild and Goldman Sachs (GS) and tech research firm Gartner (IT) ringed a conference table in a brownstone on New York's Upper East Side. They were there to learn how U.S. businesses could develop products more cheaply and quickly by borrowing strategies from India. Speaker Navi Radjou, who heads the recently formed Centre for India & Global Business at England's Cambridge University, summed up his advice in one word: jugaad. A Hindi slang word, jugaad (pronounced "joo-gaardh") translates to an improvisational style of innovation that's driven by scarce resources and attention to a customer's immediate needs, not their lifestyle wants. It captures how Tata Group, Infosys Technologies (INFY), and other Indian corporations have gained international stature. The term seems likely to enter the lexicon of management consultants, mingling with Six Sigma, total quality, lean, and kaizen, the Japanese term for continuous improvement.
Source: 

BusinessWeek

Jugaadu Website on Mobile Phones - Making accessibility easier

Ideation
  (580 reads)
Wed, Aug 13, 2008 — vincent
Purpose:

 

Everyone has a mobile. With 3G coming into the market space all over the world, people will be accessing the Internet more and more.
Detailed Concept:

 

Mobile is a fast growing market. Every individual wants one. With the Internet gradually penetrating into the mobile market, it becomes imperative that we design Jugaadu.com for mobile users. Our core focus is on making it easily accessible and a great experience.

Are focus in this discussion will be on the following aspects

1. User Interface (UI) Design

2. Page Content - What should be the conent in every page.

 

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Water pump ki Gaadi

Jugaad
  (1628 reads)
Fri, Jul 13, 2007 — maverick

Jugaad cost around Rs. 40,000. They are known for having poor brakes and can not go beyond 40 kmh. They operate on diesel fuel and are just ordinary water pump sets converted into engine.

The brakes of these vehicles very often fail and one of the passengers jumps down and applies a manual wooden block as a brake. These vehicles do not have any vehicle registration plate as they are not registered with the Regional Transport Office (RTO). Hence, they end up not paying any road tax.

 

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Jugaad: The last resort to success

Title URL: 
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/2692688.cms
Summary: 
"you know madam, people prefer coming to us rather than going to these big service stations, because their mechanics do not know jugaad. jugaad requires better skills. what is there in replacing the old part with something new and expensive, when a component can be made workable with jugaad. why pay more?" this piece of profound wisdom coming from the most unexpected of quarters, a local car mechanic, offers an insight into the mindset that we have inherited, and are able to pull along, for long, in all walks of life. how often have we managed our work with jugaad (manipulation), the ability to get by with hurriedly rustled-up solutions which replace any need for change in the systems... systems that fail to deliver, the absence of jugaad? unlike replacement, jugaad is something most of us can’t afford to live without, whether it is last minute railway reservation, or the admission of a child in a school that carries prime value, jugaad delivers all the times, at all the places. apart from information technology, the one thing indians should be proud of honing to perfection is the art of jugaad. from politics to housekeeping, nothing works without jugaad. so, if you find a piece of rope substituting for the seat belt of car, never mind. if you see a restaurant cleaner washing cups and saucers in a dirty little tub of water, ignore it. if you find hundreds of loose wires , dangerously making all the wrong kundi connections with an electricity pole, pretend you never saw it. for all of these are examples of jugaad - an art we have accepted and perfected. is jugaad a health hazard? never mind. it tells us of the great survival skills that we in india have perfected in an overcrowded, and overburdened society,with total disregard for order and discipline in all walks of life.