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The shepherd of indigenous Indian Innovation

Title URL: 
http://www.gautamblogs.com/2008/01/shepherd-of-indigenous-indian.html
Summary: 
There are some people whose name equals innovation in India. And a lot of them are unsung. However, a lot more of them might have remained unsung if it were not for Prof. Anil Gupta and his HoneyBee network. His former student and CEO of Naukri.com Sanjeev Bikhchandani writes: In the last twenty years HoneyBee has documented in its online database more than 70,000 inventions by innovators in rural India. These include – a cotton stripping / plucking machine, a manual milking machine, a coconut tree climbing device, a garlic peeling machine, a device to draw water from wells, herbal remedies, a cowdung powered cell phone charger, a plow and weeding device that can be attached to a motorcycle, a low cost cell phone based switch for household appliances and farm pump sets, a beach cleaner made from an adaptation of a groundnut separator, and a walnut peeling machine among others.
Source: 

Gautam Ghosh Blogs

The Great Indian Jugaad

Title URL: 
http://devdutt.com/the-great-indian-jugaad
Summary: 
According to Brahmavaivarta Puran, Kuber, the king of Yakshas, had a gardener called Hema, whose duty it was to gather fresh fragrant flowers every morning with which Kuber performed his daily worship of Shiva. One morning, smitten by desire for his beautiful wife, Hema refused to leave his bed and go to the garden. As a result Kuber did not get the flowers for his worship. Enraged, Kuber cursed Hema that he would be struck with an incurable skin disease and he would be separated from his wife forever. The curse took effect and Kuber’s gardener found himself alone and diseased in a faraway land. For years he suffered the curse, feeling there was no way out until one day, he told his story to a sage. Feeling sorry for Hema, the sage advised him to perform a vrat, an observance that involved fasting and praying all day on a particularly auspicious day. “If you observe this vrat with pure devotion, you will be liberated from this curse. Your health will be restored and you will be reunited with your wife.”
Source: 

Devdutt

JUGAAD... The New Buzz Word

Title URL: 
http://www.coolavenues.com/cafe/articles/vishal_jugaad_1.php3
Summary: 
Not long before, during the regime of our honorable Prime Minister Mr. H. D. Devegoda, an American statesman visited the country. The purpose of the visit was to get acquainted with the other side of the country, what euphemistically is called the real India. He was escorted by a Driver (of course with a car) and an official guide. As the car left the capital roads for the glorious cities of Meerut and Bulandshahar, the statesman had the time of his life. Four hours of non-stop drive, and they reached Baghpat. Then the inevitable happened and the driver said, "Sir, the accelerator wire has broken and the radiator is also leaking." What else is expected from a 1980 model Ambassador? "What now, thought Mr. Smith, I don't see any mechanic also, I guess I shall have to bother Mr. Devegoda again." But, the guide who almost read his mind said in his heavy South Indian accent, "Dant burry, sir, I shall do some Jugaad." Mr. Smith could not understand the last word, but how could the US bureaucrat ask a meaning from a rustic guide? He kept mum and just nodded. The Guide instructed the driver to pull the chalk and control the speed through it. Then using turmeric, a natural coagulant, he plugged the radiator leaks. Mr. Smith could not fathom the new arrangement, but needless to say, he was impressed.
Source: 

Cool Avenues

Jugaad: The last resort to success

Title URL: 
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/2692688.cms
Summary: 
"you know madam, people prefer coming to us rather than going to these big service stations, because their mechanics do not know jugaad. jugaad requires better skills. what is there in replacing the old part with something new and expensive, when a component can be made workable with jugaad. why pay more?" this piece of profound wisdom coming from the most unexpected of quarters, a local car mechanic, offers an insight into the mindset that we have inherited, and are able to pull along, for long, in all walks of life. how often have we managed our work with jugaad (manipulation), the ability to get by with hurriedly rustled-up solutions which replace any need for change in the systems... systems that fail to deliver, the absence of jugaad? unlike replacement, jugaad is something most of us can’t afford to live without, whether it is last minute railway reservation, or the admission of a child in a school that carries prime value, jugaad delivers all the times, at all the places. apart from information technology, the one thing indians should be proud of honing to perfection is the art of jugaad. from politics to housekeeping, nothing works without jugaad. so, if you find a piece of rope substituting for the seat belt of car, never mind. if you see a restaurant cleaner washing cups and saucers in a dirty little tub of water, ignore it. if you find hundreds of loose wires , dangerously making all the wrong kundi connections with an electricity pole, pretend you never saw it. for all of these are examples of jugaad - an art we have accepted and perfected. is jugaad a health hazard? never mind. it tells us of the great survival skills that we in india have perfected in an overcrowded, and overburdened society,with total disregard for order and discipline in all walks of life.